Toyota Exhibits Humanoid Robot That Imitates User

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Toyota Exhibits Humanoid Robot That Imitates User

Toyota, the Japanese auto giant, this week introduced a humanoid robot that can imitate movements of its user. This humanoid robot is a product it claims has applications as diverse as disaster response and elderly care. The T-HR3 can be managed by a wearable network that permits consumers to handle the complete robot by just moving their limbs in real-time. At the International Robot Exhibition, T-HR3 is one of the major attractions. The exhibition started this week in Tokyo.

The new robot from Toyota is the newest in number of humanoid robots that have been designed lately. Thanks to quick technological improvements, particularly in AI (artificial intelligence). “We are considering about employing this chiefly for daily life support and home elderly care,” head of Partner Robot division at Toyota, Akifumi Tamaoki, claimed to the media in an interview. “Theoretically, this robot might also be utilized in disaster areas, workplaces, and outer space.”

Robot-producers witness huge potential for their employment in Japan, where the number of aged individuals is quickly developing. This causes labor shortages in a nation that severely handles immigration. The T-HR3 boasts even human-like movements and has 32 joints. It can balance itself in single-legged positions. Sensors on the robot can recognize how much power it must put forth on objects or humans.

A head-mounted screen permits the consumers to look from the viewpoint of the black-and-white model, which has a weight of 165 Pounds (75 Kilograms) and is 5.1 Feet (1.54 Meters) tall. Toyota has no direct strategies to trade the T-HR3, whose costs of development were not revealed. In 2004, the firm revealed a trumpet-playing machine, its initial humanoid robot, in an attempt to level up with robot tech behemoths such as Sony and Honda.

Almost 3 Years later, the automaker developed one more robot that might play the violin as fraction of an attempt to design futuristic robots able to assist people in graying society of Japan.

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